Question: Who was Stalingrad?

What was Stalingrad known for?

Stalingrad was one of the most decisive battles on the Eastern Front in the Second World War. The Soviet Union inflicted a catastrophic defeat on the German Army in and around this strategically important city on the Volga river, which bore the name of the Soviet dictator, Josef Stalin.

Who killed Stalingrad?

Battle of StalingradDate23 August 1942 – 2 February 1943 (5 months, 1 week and 3 days)LocationStalingrad, Russian SFSR, Soviet Union (now Volgograd, Russia) 48°42′N 44°31′ECoordinates: 48°42′N 44°31′EResultSoviet victory Destruction of the German 6th Army1 more row

Why did Germany attack Stalingrad?

It was an important industrial city, and the Volga was an important transport route. Hitler also wanted to capture Stalingrad because it was named after Joseph Stalin, the leader of the Soviet Union, thus it would embarrass him. Hitler ordered the army to stay there. The German air force tried to supply them by air.

How did Stalingrad change the war?

The Battle of Stalingrad is considered by many historians to have been the turning point in World War Two in Europe. The battle at Stalingrad bled the German army dry in Russia and after this defeat, the Germany Army was in full retreat. The Battle for Stalingrad was fought during the winter of 1942 to 1943.

What if Stalingrad fell?

With no heavy loses at Stalingrad, Germany still have the battle-hardened troops available to continue their expansion eastwards. Its a big if, but if that did happen, the Soviet army would be in serious trouble and unlikely to continue repelling the German advances for long.

How many Soviets died in Stalingrad?

Axis casualties during the Battle of Stalingrad are estimated to have been around 800,000, including those missing or captured. Soviet forces are estimated to have suffered 1,100,000 casualties, and approximately 40,000 civilians died. The Battle of Stalingrad was one of the deadliest battles in World War II.

How many died on D-Day?

Wednesdays toll eclipsed American deaths on the opening day of the Normandy invasion during World War II: 2,500, out of some 4,400 allied dead. And it topped the toll on Sept. 11, 2001: 2,977. New cases per day are running at all-time highs of over 209,000 on average.

How many died per year in ww2?

An estimated total of 70–85 million people perished, or about 3% of the 1940 world population (est. 2.3 billion)....Total deaths by country.CountryChina (1937–1945)Total deaths15,000,000 to 20,000,000Deaths as % of 1939 population2.90 to 3.86Average Deaths as % of 1939 population3.38Military wounded1,761,33551 more columns

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